Monday, June 16, 2008

Strip, block, and appilque' quilting

One of the simplest forms of quilting is strip quilting. It is enjoyable and progresses quite quickly. I recommend it for the beginning quilter, you can't go wrong....









The above photo is a picture of madam's quilt, she choose leopard print for her room because she wanted something to grow into. I started this quilt last fall and I have committed myself to finish it before this fall, since we have moved in the new house it is harder to remain sediment at the sewing machine. Right now she has a duvet that is all one animal print. Strip quilting is basically 4 or 5 color complimentary fabric cut the same inches wide and the same in length, stitched together in columns and cut horizontal for the same size. Get it? If I have 4 colors of my choice cut 2 1/2'' (keeping in mind 1/4'' seam allowance) wide by 4' long each, I stitch them all together in rows. I measure 8'' down the piece and cut squares across the columns, the squares are flipped from one another and sewn together . In theory the strips should measure the same and the seams should be accurate. The finished "block" is ready to be trimmed evenly and all blocks should be measured the same.








In the picture you can see where I took 3, 6 1/2''x 6 1/2'' strips and flipped them the other ways, 3 groups of them then added the solid square with the appliqued dollies. My "block" quilting consist of a finished product measuring 12'' x12''. It took three constructed 12'' x12'' squares to make a row across and four squares going down the quilt, or on the side of the bed. You can see I added a border to my piece. Madams bed is a full size and I want the quilt to hang over so I added the border print. This method of quilting can be laid out so every color runs in a zig-zag pattern diagonal from one corner of the blanket to another but that's another posting. I wanted a less formal pattern with the dollies so I figured each block in a different rotations as long as the dollies weren't to close to one another. Here's the outside row cut and stitched together. Notice the repeat pattern.




This is the additional border after the leopard print border and will also be the border around the pillow covers. I've decided to applique' a larger dollies on the animal print, border it with a narrow strip, and finish the pillow cover with a large print ruffle.


When this piece is done it will be machine quilted around each dollies with a layer of fluffy batting and a solid animal print on the back as I want it to be reversible.


Madam has TWO bed ruffles, one purple and one animal. Her walls are painted purple. I hope she won't decide she wants a crazy motif when she becomes a teenager!


Sleeping in style. C&G Design.

12 comments:

tina said...

Very nice. I could never do a quilt. But I did start embroidering many, many squares with some patterns I had from Nana's old magazines. Sigh, maybe one day I will finish. I went to the quilt museum in Paducah KY last summer. It was interesting. Mostly modern stuff though. Do you have a quilting sewing machine? And I like your 'in theory'. If you don't know how to make a quilt, it can wind up bunched up. That would be me!

Dawn said...

No, just a regular sewing machine, the piecing isn't too bad but the quilting.....oay vey. Over the years I've learned to lay in on the floor and pin with safty pins, not straight pins they come out and shift the fabric. Quilting the middle of the piece bunches one side in a 8 x8 space and it is hard to say the least!

Jean said...

Madam will love it and the leporad
print has been a keeper for quite a few years with her so maybe she will not go funky as a teenager.

Tina, you can do quilting, it is just not a passion so goes by the wayside for the garden passion. You made the quilts for the twins and did a great job. I think they both still have them today, 27 years later!

tina said...

Yes Dawn, I have heard it is hard to get the quilt to lay flat.

Ah yes Mom, the quilts for the girls. I had forgotten about them. Back when I had time to sew. Not much of a garden then. I hand stitched them, probably why they are still around. But I did not piece anything together. I bought all premade fabric with quilting and batting already in it. Kelly helped me with it as she sewed. Her twin's quilts fell apart pretty early in their lives. I am glad the girls still have them. I may need help once I get all the embroidered squares done for my quilt I am making (have been for 27 years). Sad, yes I know.

Skeeter said...

I have never seen a leopard quit before! How cool…
I spent one winter with my grandmother after my grandfather died. We had a long icy winter with lots of schools closed. My grandmother and I made a quit together. When my grandmother passed away, she left instructions for the quilt to someday get to me. Once I was older, my mom gave it to me... I cherish that quilt like none other. I dont know the pattern but it is so pretty. I see the scraps from her dresses and my dresses she made me also....

Dawn said...

Hi Mom!
Tina, I will give you advise once your done.
Skeeter, what a lovely story and a nice thing to remember her by. She must of really enjoyed your time with her, it being a hard year for her.
Rain for the rest of the week, downpours on the first day of summer! School is out on Friday!

Jean said...

Tina, I knew you had hand stitched the quilts and meant to say that but forgot.

Skeeter, that is very neat and a great memory of her. My mother passed down 5 hand made quilts to me that my grandmother had made many, many years agao. I had instructions to keep one for myself and when my girls got old enough to take care of them, they were to have one. Tina took it upon herself to take hers years ago so the other girls bugged me for theirs and they now all have them!!

tina said...

Yup, still have my bowtie quilt collecting dust. Like all my other collections with sentimental value. I am afraid to use it ever but do treasure it.

Skeeter, that is nice to have that memory. Grandmothers are like that for sure and quilts and fabric are a great way to remember.

Dawn said...

Tina, you don't have a place on the back of your sofa? or maybe a unused chair? Bowtie is reeeeally nice. You can tack ribbon ties every 6 or 8 inches on one side of the quilt, tie it to a dowel and hang it as a wall sampler, providing you have a empty wall, many of us don't. I'm holding one of my plastered wall for all the embroidery samplers I have, going to join them like a quilt. I don't know what my pattern is called but it is one. Some of my books are still packed. Shelves are the last funiture needed.

tina said...

Me have an empty spot? On the wall or couch or chair. Never! I am a clutterbug and collector like you. Remember?=)

Dawn said...

Too funny....nite all

Skeeter said...

I used the quilt as our bedspread for many years then we moved up to a queen-sized bed and I bought a quilt hanger/shelf at our Craft Store in Germany and now she hangs on the wall by family photos.